Memorable Movie Moments: The Final Scene in A Time to Kill

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7f-BgDgpmE

Obviously if you haven’t seen this movie then this is a tremendous spoiler.   And honestly if you haven’t seen the movie then I would recommend you don’t press the play button.

However, if you were fortunate enough to see A Time To Kill you’ll know that this is one of the most powerful scenes in the history of cinema.  It’s also oddly enough the last great piece of acting we’ll most likely see from Matt McConaughy.   I mean I kind of liked The Lincoln Lawyer but this scene is what I thought might bring this guy to Oscar status.

In any event, it’s an amazing scene and should be recognized as one of the tops of all time.


  • Really? It’s hard to enjoy that scene when you’re a lawyer and know just how nonsensical the whole thing is. Sort of like watching a doctor force cancer out of a patient by telling it how very very sad it’s making him.

    But, to be fair, it’s kinda hard to enjoy a lot of things when you’re a lawyer.

  • Atticus

    Are you kidding me? Sure, his speech might be powerful and all, but when looking at this realistically, this was a case he had no business winning. I really disliked this movie and the ending just made it that much worse.

    But, to each their own.

  • Carmelo

    That scene bothers me. It seems to imply, that those White people are so deeply racist, that they can only feel sorry for the father of the rape victim, if they can imagine that it was a White girl who was attacked. Although, as a Black person it is kind of refreshing to see a sham verdict, in a case involving race come out on the side of the Black guy. Which almost never happens in real life (except for O.J.)

  • Mark

    You miss the point. How many white people were “innocent” purely because of their colour in similar settings (and location). The power of the speech (and it is brilliant) is to make people think without predijuce and challenge deep rooted ignorance by turning the case directly on its head. Yes is fantasy but it also challenges the very fabric of racism against basic humanity every normal person devoid of ignorance feels. Simples.